Category Archives: Community

Guard Cancel: PhoeniX

Guard Cancel is an interview series profiling KOF community members. The goal is to get to know the people behind the tags. Guard Cancel will be published every Monday. If you’d like to be featured, email admin@dreamcancel.com or PM me in the forum.

1. How long have you played KOF? Which KOF was your first? Which is your favorite?
I’ve been playing since around the start of 2010. I had dabbled in it before, but never cared much. KOF2002 is the first one I got into. KOF2002UM is probably my favorite, though I hardly get to play it.

2. Why KOF over all of the other fighters?
I liked the offense, and I liked that reversals were not that good. After a year of trying to like street fighter IV, not having to worry about someone mashing dragon punch was a real relief.

Now, I Like KOF because of the very few legitimate 50/50 mixups. Hitting the opponent in KOF is a lot more about getting the opponent to do something stupid, or conditioning him to look for something else than you intend to hit him with. It’s all reactions and reading the opponent, and far less just having a 50% chance of hitting the opponent or getting blocked/countered.

3. Are you a tournament player? If so, list your tournament rankings.
Not for King of Fighters. I’ve played Third Strike, Street Fighter 4 and a bit of Alpha 2 in local tournaments. I’ve never been good at any Street Fighter 4, I’ve done okay in local Third Strike tournaments. I’ve done well in Alpha 2 tournaments, but that doesn’t mean much, because I am the only person who plays that game seriously.

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A Guide to Frame Data

By OmegaRyuji
Introduction: What am I getting into?
If you have been looking for information on fighting games in the past decade, chances are you have at least come across some mention of “frame data.”  However, what that actually means and how to properly use it is something that players are usually left to figure out on their own.  Hopefully, this mini-guide can help you see that working with some numbers can put you on the road to a whole new way of developing and refining your play.

Basics of Frame Data: The only frames I know about are for hanging up pictures
A “frame” is a single still image which makes up part of an animation.  As you might already know, what you see when you play KOF is actually a series of still images drawn in rapid succession to create the illusion of fluid movement (or not-so-fluid, at times).

In a nutshell, frame data is a way of representing how long animations take.  Any non-projectile attack’s animation can be broken into three general phases: startup (everything that happens before the attack can actually hit), active (the time when it is possible to do damage {the time the move connects, the damage might happened like command throws}), and recovery (all of the time after the attack can no longer deal damage before the character is able to do something else).  Projectile attacks are a bit of a special case, since the active part of the animation is (usually) completely separate from the character’s animation, so the character only actually has startup and recovery animations.  Similarly, non-attacking animations, such as jumping or rolling, also go through startup and recovery animations.  What frame data tells you is how long each of those animations is based on how many frames each of those animations requires.

Now, you might be thinking, “That’s all well and good, but why not measure the animations in terms of how long they actually take, instead of using some esoteric concept that’ll end up confusing a lot of people?”  The problem with that approach is that animations are not shown at the same speed universally.  For instance, it’s not uncommon for PS2 home ports of games to run slightly faster than the arcade versions.  Similarly, the time it takes to show 30 frames in one game isn’t necessarily the same as it will be in another, and there is also the issue of occasional slowdown while playing the game (particularly when there is a lot of stuff happening on the screen).  However, no matter how much real time it takes to show them, the game will always be animated one frame at a time, which is why that can serve as a universal measure of time.

A word of warning: there are differing conventions in exactly how to count startup frames.  Some people count only the frames before any active frames, while others also include the first active frame (the second method makes things slightly easier when frame advantage and static difference come into consideration a little later).  All examples used here will NOT include the first active frame as part of the startup time, but it is something to keep in mind in case your calculations keep ending up off by 1 frame.
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Guard Cancel: Ash2k4

Guard Cancel is an interview series profiling KOF community members. The goal is to get to know the people behind the tags. Guard Cancel will be published every Monday. If you’d like to be featured, email admin@dreamcancel.com or PM me in the forum.

1. How long have you played KOF? Which KOF was your first? Which is your favorite?
I have been playing KOf for 10 years now. My first KOF was 99 and honestly, if it wasn’t for my brother, I would have never found out about kof then I heard a local arcade called Diversions had it and started playing a lot. My favorite KOF would have to be 2002 due to the competion and I just love how it’s played and looks.

2. Why KOF over all of the other fighters?
Well, I was my very first true fighter that I took serious and plus I love the fact that its a very technical based game rather than just mashing.

3. Are you a tournament player? If so, list your tournament rankings.
No, i use to play with alot of friends

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Guard Cancel: Nocturnal

Guard Cancel is an interview series profiling KOF community members. The goal is to get to know the people behind the tags. Guard Cancel will be published every Monday. If you’d like to be featured, email admin@dreamcancel.com or PM me in the forum.

1. How long have you played KOF? Which KOF was your first? Which is your favorite?
I didn’t really get into SNK fighters till around 2003 but I’ve been around long enough to know about the games. The first KoF I ever played was ’94. I remember I played it in Las Vegas when I was a kid at the MGM grand arcade. I knew about the game before hand but that was the first time I had a chance to play it. Though I never really had a chance to play any of the other KoF’s from 95-97. Mame and Kaillera introduced me to the games as I tried them out. The best KoF’s overall I think are 98/98UM and 2k2UM. I actually enjoyed KoF2k3 for the short while it lasted. It had its moments but it also had its problems.

2. Why KOF over all of the other fighters?
I think KoF has a great variety compared to most other fighters. Depending on the team you use and style you play, it really makes matches interesting.

3. Are you a tournament player? If so, list your tournament rankings.
I’ve been around the tournament scene since 2000. I didn’t really get into any major SNK tournaments till will around 04/05. Even in those times, there weren’t many players as compared to now.

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Guard Cancel: Custle

Guard Cancel is an interview series profiling KOF community members. The goal is to get to know the people behind the tags. Guard Cancel will be published every Monday. If you’d like to be featured, email admin@dreamcancel.com

1. How long have you played KOF? Which KOF was your first? Which is your favorite?
I started playing KOF in 2010. I played some SVC Chaos and I was so intrested to play this “King of Fighters” series, so I went to a nearest store that sold video games. I looked the shelves and I spotted KOF 2002 and bought it. Later I bought 98UM, 2000/2001, but the game that really got me into the series was KOF XI and it became my favorite. I was so excited about it, that I lied to my gym teacher that I was sick in the day I got it from the mail, so I could try it sooner.

2. Why KOF over all of the other fighters?
Graphical style, music, gameplay and characters. Graphically KOF has some weird charm in them, escpecially in NeoGeo titles. And it is not too “anime” compared to Guilty Gear, for example. Musics are just fantastic. There is always something for everyone. Especially the jazz themes in KOF games are just awesome. Gameplay in KOF games is fast paced, without having “air dashes” and turbo option and I loved the emergency evasion feauture (roll) so much that I wish other fighting games should have it. Character desings are just so much better compared to other 2D-fighters. They feel more “real” and aren’t so boring. Plus, they have recieved new moves during the their history.

3. Are you a tournament player? If so, list your tournament rankings.
Unfortunately I’m not. I live in bit “awkward” place for fighting game fan. But someday….
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Guard Cancel: AmedoS310

Guard Cancel is an interview series profiling KOF community members. The goal is to get to know the people behind the tags. Guard Cancel will be published every Monday. If you’d like to be featured, email admin@dreamcancel.com

1. How long have you played KOF? Which KOF was your first? Which is your favorite?
I started playing KOF casually around 2005. My first KOF was the 2000/2001 dual pack for PS2. Later, I got back into KOF with a serious approach when 2002 Unlimited Match was released in 2009. My favorite KOF games are 98um, 2002um, XI, and XIII.

2. Why KOF over all of the other fighters?
KOF brings many things to table on top of what other fighters have already brought. Also, I like the wide range of playstyles in the series.

3. Are you a tournament player? If so, list your tournament rankings.
I’m not a tournament player. The only tournament I ever played involving KOF was the KOF XIII Otakon tournament. When the console version comes out and more people start picking the game up, I might play in more tournaments.
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